Foods Rich In Fiber – 16 Food You Should Eat

Foods rich in fiber

Foods rich in fiber is best known for its regulatory effect on the functions of the intestines. But the benefits of fiber go far beyond right bowel movements. Indeed, a diet rich in fiber can reduce the risk of serious diseases: stroke, hypertension, and heart disease. Despite these indisputable benefits, if you’re like most people, you’re not getting enough fiber.

However, read on for a list of 16 Foods rich in Fiber, each time with a delicious recipe to help you put them on the table. The best foods high in fiber (Note: The amounts of fiber in foods vary slightly depending on their cooking, time, and cooking method.) Let’s know more about the foods rich in fiber.

 

16 Foods rich in fiber

  1. Split peas 

Fiber content: 8.3 g per 100 g of cooked split peas. 

Recipe to try: Old-fashioned split pea puree Split peas are a staple in Indian cuisine. 

They are also an excellent source of protein; you can use them as a base for your soups and stews. You can also use split peas in the dhal. This delicious Indian dish has everything you could want from a meal: balanced, tasty, and filling. Last thing: our homemade naans go very well with the lentils!

  1. Lentils 

Fiber content: 7.9 g per 100 g of cooked lentils. Recipe to try: Lentil soup.

The advantage of lentils is that they take little time to cook and that they are much more diverse (blond, green, black.) than other legumes (the family of beans, beans, peas, etc.). Prepared in soup, lentils reveal all their flavor: gourmets will appreciate it at its real value. 

  1. Black beans 

Fiber content: 8.7 g per 100 g of cooked black beans. 

Recipe to try: Vegetarian black bean chili Black beans are packed with slow carbohydrates that help keep you going all day and protein. 

This vegetarian chili is perfect for cold evenings but also after your workouts. 

  1. Lima beans 

Fiber content: 7.0 g per 100 g of cooked lima beans. 

Recipe to try: Lima bean chili con carne Cooked. 

Naturally, it must be admitted. Lima beans do not have a folic on taste. But prepared in chili con carne, with minced meat and just the right amount of chili, peppers, and tomatoes, they become a real treat. 

  1. Artichokes 

Fiber content: 5.7 g per 100 g of cooked artichokes. 

Recipe to try: Artichokes with vinaigrette It’s simple, artichoke is the vegetable with the most fiber per serving. But oddly enough, many people neglect the artichoke. It’s a shame! To savor it and benefit from its high fiber content, use the delicious Recipe for artichoke with vinaigrette linked above. 

  1. Peas 

Fiber content: 5.5 g per 100 g of boiled peas. 

Recipe to try: Mashed peas with mint Vegetable purees are a great way to get the best nutrients into your diet. And this Recipe is lightning fast! It is rich in protein, omega-3 fatty acids, and, of course, fiber. 

  1. Broccoli 

Fiber content: 3.3 g per 100 g of boiled broccoli. 

Recipe to try: Broccoli gratin 

This family recipe is straightforward. A little grated cheese, butter, milk, and flour: the broccoli is transformed into a delicious dish. Don’t be surprised if your kids devour this broccoli gratin in one meal!

  1. Brussels sprouts 

Fiber content: 2.6 g per 100 g of steamed Brussels sprouts. 

Recipe to try: Brussels sprouts with bacon in a casserole dish 

The classic and straightforward Recipe: Brussels sprouts, bacon, shallots. We ask for more every time!

  1. Raspberries 

Fiber content: 6.5 g per 100 g of raw raspberries. 

Recipe to try Raspberry macaroons. You don’t need to promote raspberries. Raspberries are a bit like nature giving us sweets! And if also they come in the form of macaroons, NOBODY can resist.

  1. Blackberries 

Fiber content: 5.3 g per 100 g of raw blackberries. 

Recipe to try: Blackberry crumble 

It’s hard to miss the grind when we talk about recipes that are simple to make and delicious to taste. Try blackberry crumble, and you are incorporating even more fiber into your diet. As with raspberries, out of season, use frozen blackberries: don’t worry, the fibers are still there! 

  1. Lawyers 

Fiber content: 6.7g per 100g, roughly half an avocado. 

Recipe to try: Guacamole 

Few foods deserve the label “superfood” – and none more so than avocado. Avocado contains loads of vitamins, fiber, and “good” fats. And what could be better than good guacamole to taste all the nutritional richness of avocado? 

  1. Pears 

Fiber content: 5.5g per 175g, a medium-sized pear. 

Recipe to try: Pork tenderloin with pears and honey 

Simple and inexpensive, this Recipe will allow you to try unusual mixtures of sweet and savory flavors. The pork goes well with the sweet flavors. And pears, which are naturally high in sugar, caramelize easily. Yum ! 

  1. Wheat bran cereal’s 

Fiber content: 18.3 g per 100 g of raw grains. 

Recipe to try: Multivitamin smoothie with wheat bran cereal 

Don’t have enough time in the morning to prepare yourself a breakfast? This smoothie recipe only takes a moment. Mix all your fruits, and all you have to do is add a nice handful of wheat bran cereals (different from oat bran) to your glass. And There you go! Fast, healthy, delicious fiber and protein – all in one gulp. 

  1. Whole grain pasta 

Fiber content: 3.9 g per 100 g of cooked pasta. 

Recipe to try: Zucchini pasta opped with a good sauce, whole grain pasta is genuinely comparable to wheat flour pasta. Add zucchini, and you have a delicious vegetarian meal on the go! 

  1. Pearl barley 

Fiber content: 3.8 g per 100 g of cooked pearl barley. 

Recipe to try: Tomato barley with vegetable 

Barley is not just an ingredient used to brew beer. These chewy-textured seeds are packed with great nutrients. They contain even more fiber than oatmeal and wild rice. They can be enjoyed in soup or a salad. But THE Recipe to try is this barley tomato with seasonal vegetables. 

  1. Oatmeal 

Fiber content: 1.7 g per 100 g of cooked oatmeal. 

Recipe to try: Oatmeal 

Pallets Easy to take with you, these oatmeal pucks are divine. But they will also help you recharge your batteries after a workout. 

4 tips to add even more foods rich in fiber to your diet

Add linseed oil to your food: salad dressing, oatmeal, smoothies, yogurt, and homemade pastries. You can even use it for bread, chicken, and fish. Flaxseed oil contains 3.8g of fiber for just 2 tbsp. Also, it has a high content of omega-3 fatty acids. Chia seeds have a unique fiber content: 5.5 g per 1 tbsp. When mixed with water, they become gelatinous. However, they are perfect for thickening your smoothies, making homemade puddings, or replacing eggs in baking recipes. 

Why should you eat foods rich in fiber? 

Our body needs fiber, even if it doesn’t digest it. Indeed, the fibers are not really “digested” between the moment we ingest them and our passage to the toilet. There are two varieties of fiber: soluble and insoluble. 

Most foods from the plant family contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. In the digestive system, soluble fiber turns into a gel, which slows down digestion. As a result, it lowers cholesterol and blood sugar levels. On the other hand, insoluble fibers do not undergo any modification until the colon, where they help give mass and soften the excrements (which makes them easier to evacuate). 

Regardless of how they work, these two varieties of fiber are never absorbed by the body, which does not make them any less essential to our health! A diet low in fiber can indeed cause constipation, making going to the bathroom painful and unpleasant. 

It can also cause blood sugar regulation and appetite disturbances. Fiber regulates the speed of digestion and contributes to satiety (the feeling of having eaten enough). But having too much fiber a day can also be bad for your health. Indeed, too much fiber can cause too rapid transit. As a result, the body does not have time to absorb all the nutrients from the foods you eat. Overeating fiber can also cause unpleasant bloating and intestinal cramps (enormously when fiber intake is suddenly increased overnight). 

To discover The 10 Benefits of Chia Seeds That Nobody Knows. 

Spinach and carrots are not as high in fiber as the above foods. However, they can easily be grated or chopped and incorporated into your favorite dishes and recipes. You can also add it to banana cake, eggs, and homemade pizza sauce. 

The food processor is the best ally we can have in the kitchen! With your food processor, make vegetable purees that you can incorporate into your favorite sauces and stews. And to replace rice, try this unusual trick: go from cauliflower to the food processor. Enjoy your meal! However, there you have it, you have discovered the 16 foods rich in fiber.

 

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FAQ of foods rich in fiber

  1. What are the harms of bananas? 

In the morning, it will therefore cause cravings and slackness, leading to nibbling;  As for the peak of sugar in the blood, it increases our tendency to store fat.  When digested alone, its acid level can even go as far as causing indigestion or stomach irritation.  

  1. Is it good to eat a banana every morning?

Helps in weight loss 

Eating a banana in the morning has the advantage of giving a long-lasting feeling of satiety. Besides, it partially blocks the absorption of carbohydrates – the perfect fruit to add to your diet. 

  1. What are the fibers that make you lose weight?

Soluble fiber, the secret to losing weight

Finally, they prolong the feeling of satiety.  As the name suggests, soluble fiber dissolves in liquids.  However, the good sources are: apples, pears, eggplants, oats, legumes.

  1. Is it reasonable to eat kiwi in the morning?

Fill up on vitamin C with one kiwi in the morning on an empty stomach “right out of bed”!  After exercise, in recovery ration, this fruit effectively contributes to anti-radical defenses and recovery.  It also improves Glycogen storage restoration by its richness in vitamin C, water, and sugar.

  1. Why it’s necessary to eat fiber?

Most foods from the plant family contain a mixture of soluble and insoluble fiber. In the digestive system, soluble fiber turns into a gel, which slows down digestion. As a result, it lowers cholesterol and blood sugar levels. On the other hand, insoluble fibers do not undergo any modification until the colon, where they help give mass and soften the excrements (which makes them easier to evacuate). 

  1. Is it bad to have too much fiber?

Fiber regulates the speed of digestion and contributes to satiety (the feeling of having eaten enough). But having too much fiber a day can also be bad for your health. Indeed, too much fiber can cause too rapid transit. As a result, the body does not have time to absorb all the nutrients from the foods you eat. 

However, overeating fiber can also cause unpleasant bloating and intestinal cramps (enormously when fiber intake is suddenly increased overnight). 

 

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Conclusion of foods rich in fiber

So what is the magic amount of fiber for a healthy, balanced diet? The daily intake recommended by the European Food Safety Authority is 25 g minimum for an adult (male or female). Men and women over 50 needless fiber because they generally eat less food. But what do these contributions represent? 

It’s effortless. Every day, a man must eat the equivalent of 10 slices of whole-grain bread to have his daily fiber intake. 

It may sound like a lot, but fear not! Whole grains are far from the only food rich in fiber. However, we hope you will benefit from today’s article. Please write us your valuable comment.

 

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